Sunday, August 28, 2016
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Discovery of Vietnam and Cambodia - 12 days
Day 4 Hanoi - Hue (B/L)  (650km – 1h00: by plane) After breakfast, transfer to the airport to take your morning flight to Hue. Between 1802 and 1945, Hue was the imperial capital of the Nguyen Dynasty. As such, it is well known for its monuments and architecture. Its population stands at about 340,000 people...
Vietnam Discovery - 12 Days Day 1 HANOI - arrival Welcome at the airport and transfer to your selected hotel. Overnight in Hanoi. Day 2 HANOI city (B/L) After breakfast, spend your day taking a tour around the capital...
Vietnam Classic Tour from Hanoi - 14 Days
  Day 1  HANOI arrival (D) When arriving, welcome at the airport and transfer to your selected hotel. Visit the Ho Chi Minh Mausoleum (outside), his former residence, One Pillar Pagoda, Temple of Literature, Hoan Kiem Lake,...
Heritages in Vietnam - 15 days
Day 1 HANOI - arrival
When arriving in Hanoi, transfer to your selected hotel. Overnight in Hanoi. Day 2 HANOI (B/L)...

Tourism News

  • Vietnam's climate and environment differ by latitude

    Differentiation by latitude

    According to the zonal laws of the Earth, temperature decreases as one travels from low to high latitudes. So the further southward you go in Vietnam, the hotter it gets, and the more distinctly tropical it becomes. However, this differentiation also has some notable features:

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  • Ashes and diamonds

    The life of a star is far from over once it becomes a red giant; gravity becomes more important than ever. A star’s destiny is completely controlled by its mass. More massive stars evolve more rapidly, using up their nuclear reserves more quickly. The nuclear lifetime of the Sun is about 12 billion years, but stars which are 10 times more massive will have a nuclear life which is 1000 times shorter. In addition, what they produce is not the same. The most massive stars produce the heaviest elements.For the moment let us consider the destiny of more modest stars, like the Sun.

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  • The southern part of Eastern Europe

    The southern part of Eastern Europe is a land of contrasts. Rugged mountains break the land into many tiny valleys. Rushing rivers cut through the rough land. Along the coasts, the warm waters of the Black, Adriatic, and Aegean seas wash beautiful beaches.
    Following World War II, the governments of Yugoslavia and Romania were under Communist control. Both had, however, leaders who were willing to stand up to the Soviet Union.
    Yugoslavia
    The name Yugoslavia means “country of the south Slavs.” Five Slavic ethnic groups make up most of the nation’s population. An ethnic group is a group of people who share customs, traditions, history, language, religion, and other parts of their way of life. The five main groups are the Serbs, Croats, Slovenes, Montenegrins, and Macedonians. Another group, the Bosnians, are Muslims.
    It is not surprising, then, that there are 3 official languages, 3 major religions, and 2 alphabets used in Yugoslavia. In Yugoslavia, most citizens are bilingual. That is, they speak at least 2 languages.
    Yugoslavia under Tito During World War II, Germany defeated Yugoslavia’s army after two months of savage fighting. Even after the army surrendered, many Yugoslavs continued to fight.
    Among the leaders of these fighters was Josip Broz, who called himself Tito . Tito was a Communist, and many of the fighters he commanded were also Communists. By the end of the war, Tito’s Communists controlled nearly the entire country. In the 1945 elections, they won an overwhelming majority of the votes.
    By 1948, Tito no longer followed the Soviet Union’s orders on how to run his country. In the years that followed, Yugoslavia built ties with both Communist and non- Communist countries.
    A look at a map shows one reason why Yugoslavia has been able to break away from the Soviet Union’s control. Yugoslavia shares no border with the Soviet Union. Even more important, Yugoslavia has a long coastline that is easy to reach from Western Europe. With such a long seacoast, Yugoslavia could easily get help from non-Communist countries in times of trouble. Tito knew that, and so did the leaders of the Soviet Union. Thus, the Soviet Union did not try to send its soldiers into Yugoslavia.
    Yugoslavia Today Today Yugoslavia calls itself a federal republic. That is, power is shared between the national government—which is Communist and located in the capital of Belgrade—and the governments of six smaller republics within the country. Each republic represents one of Yugoslavia’s major ethnic groups and has its own capital, history, and way of life.
    Recent reforms in Yugoslavia have caused divisions among many of the country’s ethnic groups. This, in combination with a worsening economy, has created a difficult challenge for Yugoslavia’s national leaders.
    As in Poland, the Yugoslavian farmers resisted collective farming. The government stopped insisting on collectives when it noticed that farmers who worked their own land produced more crops.
    Tourism is an important business for Yugoslavia. Its Adriatic coast has a mild Mediterranean climate. Because the country has ties to non-Communist countries, it gets many more tourists than it would otherwise.
    Romania Before being conquered by the Romans around a.d. 100, Romania was the home of the Dacians . Over time, the Romans and the Dacians blended to form a new culture. Today the Romanians speak a language that comes from Latin, the language of the Romans.
    Romania and the Soviet Union Near the end of World War II, the Soviet Union’s army moved into Romania. Because of a long history of trouble between the Soviet Union and Romania, the Soviets treated Romania harshly. Much of Romania’s wealth disappeared into the Soviet Union. After the Soviet army left Romania in 1958, ties between the two nations gradually grew weaker.
    Romania's Revolution Beginning in 1967, Romania was ruled by a brutal, totalitarian leader named Nicolae Ceausescu. Ceausescu created a strict dictatorship under which people had very few rights. All criticism of the government was forbidden. As a result of Ceausescu’s decisions to export most of Romania’s oil and food, people suffered from severe shortages of food and fuel.
    In 1989, a large crowd of Romanians gathered to voice their anger against Communist control. Security forces fired into the crowd, killing no one knows for certain how many people. Within days, protests spread throughout Romania. In the fighting that followed, thousands of Romanians were killed—including
    Ceausescu and his wife, who were captured, quickly tried, and executed. The new government of Romania promised to hold free elections within six months and to end the government’s tight control of people’s lives.
    The southern part of Eastern Europe is a land of contrasts. Rugged mountains break the land into many tiny valleys. Rushing rivers cut through the rough land. Along the coasts, the warm waters of the Black, Adriatic, and Aegean seas wash beautiful beaches.
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  • The ether

    The ether
    ‘The ether, this child of sorrow of classical mechanics . . /
    Max Planck
    If all reference frames moving with constant velocity art equivalent to one at rest, it is tempting to imagine a truly immobile frame rooted in the absolute space of Euclidean geometry. For Galileo, this absolute space was attached to the Sun which was the centre of the Universe. For Newton, it was the ethery Aristotle’s fifth essence (quintessence), a perfectly rigid vibrating substance whkfe permeated the void between physical bodies and the bodies themselves.
    The advent of electromagnetic theory appeared to support the idea of the ether. It is difficult to conceive of a wave which does not have a medium through which to propagate: sound waves cause the air to vibrate, and sea waves require water. Light, an oscillation of electric and magnetic fields, must therefore be assumed also to require a vibrating medium through which to propagate indepently of observers. Thus the ether could be defined as the medium through which electromagnetic waves propagate.
    Let us return to the marksman on the train travelling at * 30 m/s. This time he uses a light-gun, firing photon projectiles a velocity of 300 000 km/s. Using the Galilean transformation
    The ether
    ‘The ether, this child of sorrow of classical mechanics . . /
    Max Planck
    If all reference frames moving with constant velocity art equivalent to one at rest, it is tempting to imagine a truly immobile frame rooted in the absolute space of Euclidean geometry. For Galileo, this absolute space was attached to the Sun which was the centre of the Universe. For Newton, it was the ethery Aristotle’s fifth essence (quintessence), a perfectly rigid vibrating substance whkfe permeated the void between physical bodies and the bodies themselves.
    The advent of electromagnetic theory appeared to support the idea of the ether. It is difficult to conceive of a wave which does not have a medium through which to propagate: sound waves cause the air to vibrate, and sea waves require water. Light, an oscillation of electric and magnetic fields, must therefore be assumed also to require a vibrating medium through which to propagate indepently of observers. Thus the ether could be defined as the medium through which electromagnetic waves propagate.
    Let us return to the marksman on the train travelling at * 30 m/s. This time he uses a light-gun, firing photon projectiles a velocity of 300 000 km/s. Using the Galilean transformation
    formulae, the observer on the embankment would measure the velocity of light to be equal to c + v = 300 000.030 km/s in the same direction as the train and c - v = 299 999.997 km/s in the opposite direction. Michelson and Morley’s experiments, where the Earth and the ether replace the train and the embankment, show this reasoning to be false.
    ‘The ether, this child of sorrow of classical mechanics . . /
    Max Planck
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